U-Visa Application: Helping Nonimmigrant Victims in Miami

As violence takes over the lives of some nonimmigrant women and men in South Florida, the law finds ways to keep them safe. The USCIS approved a maximum of 10,000 petitions for U-1 nonimmigrant status or U visas for 2016, making this year the seventh consecutive year that reaches the maximum since it all started in 2009. Victims can find protection through the U-visa application. The applicant being hurt by a U.S citizen can submit a U-visa application and get a Green Card. Anyone can seek shelter under the U-visa application umbrella as long as they meet some specific requirements.

Each year, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) makes thousands of U-visas available for victims of qualifying crimes who have suffered considerable physical and mental abuse and are willing to cooperate with law enforcement authorities in order to investigate or prosecute these crimes. The U-Visa process is quite different from other US visas. For instance, a certification called Certification of Helpfulness is granted, which means that the victim has been helpful to law enforcement.

Those who are granted a U nonimmigrant status can also file for a green card by using Form I-485. This is the application to adjust status, after some specific requirements have been met, which may include:

  • You should have lived in the US for at least 3 years since the first day of being admitted as a U nonimmigrant and have the same status when applying.
  • You haven’t refused to cooperate with criminal investigation and prosecution.
  • Under section 2129(a)(3)(E) you are not inadmissible.
  • Your presence in US is based on good grounds.

If you are an immigrant victim of violent crimes in Miami and you are searching for a well-versed lawyer to help you protect you and your family, contact Gallardo law Firm. We haveimmigration lawyers Miami who will carry you through the whole U visa application process and help you understand your options. Your safety is our priority.